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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
to cooperate with china on many other fronts. we have many other engagements in terms of science and technology, clean energy, collaboration's by our center for disease control, trying to look at the various world health problems, the solutions to which benefit united states as well. we will always have disagreements. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacifi
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> italy's mario monti announcing he would consider seeking a second term as italian prime minister if approached by allies that are committed to actually backing his reforms. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us on set. you can see that andrew was taking some shots. >> a new camera. >> i'm so used to it wherever i go. andrew, we've got the fire behind you. >> it's summer cute. >> the sweater. >> yeah. >> but it's an orange -- i don't understand why it's orange. it's hal weeb. >> it's a red sweater. >> look at it. i know it's coming a little bit orangey. >> on tv. >> okay. >> lovely. thank you. love the guys in the control room. >> so here's italy. silvio berlusconi. your intro was about mario monti which is all true. silvio berlusconi, the former prime minister of italy -- >> my favorite. >> thank goodness for silvio berlusconi. >> look at his hair. what is he, 76? >> 76. he just sat down with cnbc italy over the weekend. silvio berlusconi says he does not want to run for prime minister, but, he is oblig
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)